Tag Archive for 'tire recycling'

Tyre & Rubber Recycling October 2016 – DEVULCANIZATION

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Asian Retread Conference Kuala Lumpur October 2016

These are the results from evaluations of SRI’s latest development in it’s Devulcanization Technology which has pushed the boundaries of what is possibly in terms of recycling scrap rubber and converting it into value added rubber compound. In this case the SRI compound with added sulphur alone can now be vulcanized again. Even more impressive are the recovered properties from the devulcanized rubber compound on its own, however the true testament to compounds performance comes from the properties generated in blends.

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The surprising detail in this case is that the scrap from buffing dust after the SRI Devulcanization process yields more than 9.6MPa with and extarodinary  Elongation at break of in excess of 300% on its own. The fact is these results are well within the parameters required for a number of applications as is. This changes the general perception of what can be achieved by recycling, effectively taking it to a higher level than ever possible before.

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The results above totally changed the existing understanding of what can and cannot be done in terms of recycling rubber scrap. Through the SRI Devulcanization Technology with it’s latest development has completely revolutionized rubber recycling and made devulcanization the sustainable and cost effective way forward.

In the above case SRI has taken an Asian volume consumption, medium grade compound and added  SRI DVR Compound (buffing feedstock) up to 30% by weight. The results speak for themselves marginal change in tensile to up to 30% loading but extraordinarily no loss in EB% at all.

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Rolling Resistance and Heat Buildup are the primary cause of CO2 generation and impact on global warming from all truck and passenger car tyres from their manufacture, feedstock, logistics through to running on the roads. The accepted indicator of impact on Rolling Resistance and Heat buildup in rubber compounds is measure of Rebound Hysteresis. The challenge has always been to find materials that do not adversely impact the CO2 generated by tyres, the problem being that all rubber related recycled content have a deleterious impact on the rebound hysteresis.

The above are Rebound Hysteresis results of SRI DVR Compound in tread rubber applications measured by 2 global tyre manufacturers. They effectively confirm that SRI Devulcanization Technology produces rubber compound that does not change the Rolling Resistance properties when blended at high loading with global commercial truck and passenger car tyre compounds.

Given that only a little more than 13% of the CO2 generated by tyres is from it production and related areas, the vast majority of CO2 generated by tyres more than 86% is from the tyres on the road through to its end of life. This means that the SRI DVR Compound contributes to the sustainability of tyres in terms of 13% CO2 generated through production and based on the above results it has an even greater impact on the 86% of CO2 generated by the tyres on the road.

The SRI Devulcanization Technology, Real Sustainability, Real Solutions, Greening the Environment One Tyre at a Time.

European Rubber Journal Report on Tire Recycling – SRI Featured

SRI has been featured in the September / October edition of The European Rubber Journal.

In this issue, David Shaw’s  report asks the important question, “Why is recycled rubber not used in tyres?”

The European Rubber Journal is the world’s leading publication specialising in the rubber industry in Europe.

Magazine copies and back issues are available for purchase here

(PDF download)

Cleantech Solution – Polymers & Tyre Asia interview with SRI CEO

Click to download PDF of article

SRI’s CEO, Gopinath B. Sekhar was recently interviewed by Tyre Asia Magazine. The February / March issue will be also distributed at the Tire Tech Expo 2011 in Cologne, Germany.

The devulcanizing technology that Sekhar Research Innovations (SRI) has developed, for which it won the 2010 Asia Pacific Technology Innovation Award for Tire Recycling Technology by international consulting firm Frost & Sullivan, is set to change the way end-of-life tyres are perceived and managed. SRI CEO Gopinath B Sekhar says the compound created by his firm’s cleantech process, which uses very little energy, can be utilised to make new tyres, retread old ones and make automotive parts. This will be particularly economically at a time when natural rubber prices have
gone through the roof.

With automobile industry booming in China and India, tyre production in the world’s most populous countries is growing very fast with China already topping the list as the world’s largest producer. Along with this, comes the problem of environment-friendly disposal of end-of-life tyres. In this context, SRI’s tyre recycling is a viable green option for emerging economies.

“India has a long history of recycling which predates the terms of ‘cleantech’ and ‘green’. China in particular has shown a capacity for rapid adoption of all things green, with 1/4 of their energy requirements now being supplied by clean energy,” Sekhar noted.
The need for the recycling of scrap tyres in a responsible and appropriate manner is no longer just a necessity but it is now an imperative, he emphasised.

The already substantial automotive markets of north America and Europe are now being joined and even surpassed by Asia where these industries are on explosive growth. “Existing systems to manage the volumes of scrap generated are going to be outstripped very quickly leaving a path of unacceptable environmental damage in its wake,” he warned. “When I refer to the imperative, I’m not referring to lip service or peripheral low volume applications, but the imperative is for a process that can keep up with the volume of scrap generated.”

Continue reading full article in pdf format.

SRI featured on Discovery

Today, over half the recovered end of life tires in the World are incinerated in low end and unhealthy applications like TDF (tire derived fuel). The argument for burning tires has been that no alternative exists that can consume the huge volume of waste tires generated yearly. Technology has now caught up with the scrap tire problem, effectively ending the need to burn this valuable raw material as low grade fuel. Thank you to Discovery Channel for featuring SRI as a leading tire recycling company with the potential to address this solid waste issue with technology and innovation.

..processing an old tire back into a new one remains extremely difficult. The production process alters the materials’ properties, making them hard to reclaim. So far, tire recycling hasn’t been able to produce significant amounts of affordable, high-performance compounds. Sekhar Research Innovations (SRI) is a startup based in the Malaysian city Petaling Jaya. They say their patent-pending technological process can devulcanize rubber from whole scrap tires, creating a compound that can be used to make new tires, retread old ones, and make automotive parts.The technology can work at high volumes and requires very little energy, says SRI.. “Ours is the first closed-loop rubber recycling solution that can match the volume requirements of rubber manufacturing.”

This fall, consulting firm Frost and Sullivan gave the company a technology innovation of the year award for their tire recycling process. “Large-scale implementation of SRI’s recycling technology could ultimately lead to greener, ecofriendly cars on our roads,” the firm stated. Currently the company is in the process of commercializing its process and plans to open a production facility in Malaysia.

Continue reading at Discovery.com

SRI Receives Asia Pacific Technology Innovation Award

Sekhar Research Innovations (SRI) has been awarded the 2010 Asia Pacific Technology Innovation Award for Tire Recycling Technology by Frost & Sullivan. SRI received the Asia Pacific award in recognition of its performance against key competitors in terms of uniqueness of technology, impact on new products/applications, functionality, customer value and the relevance of SRI’s innovation to the tire recycling industry.

Frost & Sullivan’s Technology Innovation of the Year Award is bestowed upon a company that has carried out new research, which has resulted in the development of a specific innovative technology that has or is expected to bring significant contributions to the industry in terms of adoption, change, and competitive posture. This award recognizes the quality and depth of a company’s research and development program as well as the vision and risk-taking that enabled it to undertake such an endeavor.

SRI is honored to receive this prestigious award. We thank Frost & Sullivan for recognizing the disruptive potential of our technology and its significance as a milestone in the Asia Pacific cleantech industry.

PDF of notification from Frost & Sullivan to SRI

SRI Compound – Overview and Simplified Preliminary Demonstration

Overview and Simplified Preliminary Demonstration

Our starting point is the standard production output from a 40 mesh crumb rubber producer. While the “Surface Activation Process” is effective with material ranging from 40 mesh and better all the way to Cryogenic crumb in the 120 to 200 mesh range, we will be carrying out our process trials with standard generic 40 mesh “whole truck” dust. Once activated the highly reactive material is subjected to either a modified reclaim process or any one of the devulcanization technologies currently available. Proprietary processing aids would then be added to the mix and the resultant reactivated compound is then blended with a modified version of the virgin compound used by manufacturers. What you have at this point is a custom compound that has been tailored to whichever product category intended (in this case heavy truck retread compound). This material which is now a thoroughbred raw material, can be added into their process line with no material modification, added process activity or any additional cost factors in the manufacturers operation and most importantly without any appreciable loss in properties. This has never been viably and cost effectively done before, there have been material approximations, mostly in the form of fillers or processing aids masquerading as raw materials, none of which are remotely comparable. This in itself is a significant factor, effectively the SRI Compound would be dropped into the final minute of their normal production mixing cycle in their Banburys or intermixs. The manufacturer would be able to substitute virgin compound with our recycled compound ranging in proportions from 5% to up to 30% subject to the application and the properties required without any appreciable loss in properties allowing them to be environmentally responsible while enhancing their viability. The SRI Compound once fully developed will be a world beating recycling solution, setting a totally new standard for performance and viability.




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